Martial arts are a value-driven system


old Martial artsIn the past, the main objective of martial arts was effective and efficient combat that regularly resulted in mortality or caused some degree of injury, often very severe, while today, martial arts are being used in more than one way. The first would be in the direct usage of martial arts that serves the original purpose. It is only used in extreme situations by military, police, and such organizations.Nowadays, the term is usually associated with various unarmed Asian martial arts, such as Wing Chun, karate do, judo, taekwondo, aikido, and others, and martial arts using mostly cold weaponry, such as kendo, ninjutsu, battojutsu. In reality, it encompasses a whole plethora of martial arts from around the world, like boxing, savate, capoeira, jeet kune do, krav maga, fencing, and much more. But here we need to be aware of the differences in the ways of thinking coming from the environments influenced by Confucianism, Daoism, or Buddhism on one side, and the West on the other. This is all reflected in those martial arts. While the Chinese martial arts are predominantly rhythmic in movement, the Western tend to be more dynamic and tense.
Bruce LeeThe next usage that to emphasis is dated in the latter half of the last century, where we have seen rise of martial arts usage in inspiring activities that do not inflict serious injuries, as they purposefully take a form of or are used in exercise, sports, and competitions, and for self-defense. The original hardness and the basic spirit of martial arts were somewhat lost in these pursuits, as the competitive »point collecting« objective comes to the fore.
Archer
The last one is the one we use in dojo. Where the skill, however, remains the main focus of martial arts where, in places like dojo, and where the presence of a tradition of learning from a teacher who carries out the instruction and transference of the knowledge in the physical, mental, and spiritual sense exists. Here, one strives to achieve a harmony between the outer world, one’s body, and inner energy. When in balance, one feels content, healthy, and energized.


A martial artist without philosophy is nothing more than a street fighter. (wǔ shù wisdom)

1 comment:

  1. Very interesting blog. Alot of blogs I these days don't really provide anything that I'm interested in, but I'm most definately interested in this one. Just thought that I would post and let you know.
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